Premier League and UK Government working to create a law to prevent future Super League revival attempts

The British government will revoke work permits for any overseas player or manager working for a club involved with any future breakaway plans comparable to the so-called Super League.

The Home Office has supported plans from the FA to threaten the removal of the Governing Body Endorsement (GBE) – required for working permits for those players and managers in the Premier League from abroad.

The details are outlined by a report in The Times as the latest step to combat the threat of another breakaway proposal similar to the Super League, which involved six clubs from the Premier League.

The ‘big six’ clubs of Manchester City, Manchester United, Arsenal, Liverpool, Tottenham and Chelsea were among the 12 founding members of the breakaway plans. The Premier League clubs that were initially involved have been fined £3.67 million each and a future attempt from any club could result in an individual fine of £25million along with a 30-point deduction.

The European Super League is a proposed breakaway competition from the UEFA Champions League that initially had the support of 12 founding clubs. However, three days after the unveiling of plans to commence the league were announced; the league suspended its operations due to massive protests in England by fans of English clubs who opposed the league and the subsequent exit of 9 founding members. A major criticism of the league by the fans and media was that it promoted elitism and a lack of competitiveness.

Only 3 clubs out of the original 12 founding members remain – Juventus, Real Madrid and FC Barcelona. On 31 May 2021, the Super League company filed a complaint to the Court of Justice of the European Union against Swiss-based FIFA and UEFA for their proposals finalized to stop the organization of the competition.

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