Taliban accused for the killing of 11 bus passengers in Afghanistan

Four women and three children killed as the bomb struck the bus consisting 11 civilians in Kabul, Taliban is said to be accused for by the officials of Afghanistan.

On Sunday, the officials from Afghanistan said that the latest attack in the country killed 11 civilians including four women and three children when a roadside bomb struck the bus in Kabul.

The attacks which occurred on Saturday evening in the western province of Badghis, raised fears of fresh violence in the months ahead as the US military continues to pull out its last remaining troops from the country.

No certain group has yet claimed the responsibility of the blast but the governor of Badghis, Hessamuddin Shams, has accused the Taliban for the planting of the bomb which led to the death of these civil. To which another official from the said province, Khodadad Tayeb, confirmed and said that the bus had fallen into a valley after it was hit by the bomb. 

The jihadist Islamic State has claimed two back-to-back attacks on buses in Kabul.

The violence has peaked recently due to daily battles between the government forces and Taliban across the countryside.

Taliban on Saturday confirmed that they have “captured the district of Deh Yak” in the province of Ghazni, about 150 kilometres south of Kabul. To which the authorities said they had only “relocated” their forces from the said area. The province sees frequent clashes between the two sides. 

In 2018, the Taliban had completely seized the provincial capital Ghazni, the attacks led to destroying many government buildings.

This sudden increase in the violence began as the US military forces continues to withdraw its remaining 2,500 troops from the country. President Joe Biden has issued order to get the American troops out of the country by September 11, which will mark 20th anniversary for the 9/11 attacks.

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