Tokyo Olympic planners and the International Olympic Committee are moving forward despite public opposition

This is a clear sign that Tokyo Olympic planners and the International Olympic Committee are moving forward despite public opposition, warnings about the risks of the games becoming a spreader event, and Tokyo and other parts of Japan being under a state of emergency until June 20.

Roads were closed Tuesday around Tokyo Olympic venues, including the new $1.4 billion National Stadium, which will host the opening ceremony on July 23.

This is a clear indication that Tokyo Olympic organizers and the International Olympic Committee are pressing on despite popular resistance, warnings about the dangers of the games becoming a spreader event, and Tokyo and other regions of Japan being declared in a state of emergency until June 20.

“Today, we are just 45 days away from the opening ceremony, despite the fact that the state of emergency is in existence and the situation remains terrible throughout the country,” organizing committee President Seiko Hashimoto told an executive board meeting on Tuesday.

In Tokyo, new infections are down to roughly 500 cases a day, down from 1,000 a month ago. The number of hospitalizations and very ill people has also declined, although it is still more than it was last autumn, when COVID-19 variations were not prominent in Japan.

Last Monday, experts on the Tokyo Metropolitan Government’s pandemic panel stated that people’s mobility in downtown Tokyo had been increasing for three weeks. They warned that if patients continue to improve their mobility, additional illnesses might resurface.

According to the Prime Minister’s office, 3.66 percent of Japanese people were completely vaccinated as of Monday. In what has been a delayed vaccination distribution, 10.7 percent got at least one injection, according to the report.

Japan has ascribed around 13,500 fatalities to COVID-19, which is good by certain criteria but not as low as many Asian countries. Dr. Hiroshi Oshitani, a virologist at Tohoku University and a government expert, warned about the possibility of infection spreading in Japan and other nations during the Olympics.

 

 

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